Cast Iron Slotted Calibration Weights & Hangers – M1 Accuracy

The  hanger weight is a weight in itself, that also has its weight Calibrated so that the hanger can be used as part of the overall weight under test,  and will hold a number of Cast Iron slotted weights depending on its usable shaft lengths. The slotted weights are discs with slots in them and are designed to sit on the hanger. Several Cast Iron Slotted Weights may be used together to build up from a minimum weight to a maximum test load.

These weights are used to test force gauges, crane scales or other suspended weighing scales. Cast Iron Slotted Weights are primarily used to calibrate large capacity scales.

Shanker Wire Products Industries (SWPI) Cast Iron Slotted Weights are manufactured from a high quality iron. The surface are free of cracks, pits and sharp edges. All surfaces are smooth and free of scratches, dents and pores. Weights are protected by a durable coat of paint to protect the casting from rusting.

The M1 Cast Iron slotted hanger weights (Newton Cast Iron Slotted Weights, Kilogram Cast Iron Slotted Weights)  are the most common hanger weights we sell and are suitable for testing and calibration in the 5 N / 500 g up to 200 N / 20 kg.

Cast Iron Slotted Weight Hangers:

Cast Iron Slotted Weights are typically used with a hanger that also has its weight calibrated so the hanger can be used as part of the overall weight under test. Weight hangers are available in a variety of lengths and weight capacities. Hangers are calibrated to a mass value, and also have a capacity of how much weight can be loaded onto them.

Calibration Weight Certification:

You will normally need a calibration certificate to satisfy, if the tests that you do are on equipment that can effect the quality of your product and you are audited by an outside organization. Our Calibration Laboratory is NABL accredited in accordance with the standard ISO/IEC 17025 : 2017, So you can be satisfied with the quality and accuracy of the Cast Iron Newton Slotted Weights and Hangers.

Construction and General Shape:

Cast Iron Slotted Weights have adjusting cavities. Each weight has its nominal value cast into the topside of the weight. Weights are protected by a durable coat of paint to protect the casting from rusting.

Click here to enquire about Cast Iron slotted Weights and Hanger:

http://www.slotterweight.com

Newton Weights

A newton is defined as 1 kg⋅m/s2 (it is a derived unit which is defined in terms of the SI base units). One newton is therefore the force needed to accelerate one kilogram of mass at the rate of one metre per second squared in the direction of the applied force. The units “metre per second squared” can be understood as a change in velocity per time, i.e. an increase of velocity by 1 metre per second every second.

In 1946, Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures (CGPM) Resolution 2 standardized the unit of force in the MKS system of units to be the amount needed to accelerate 1 kilogram of mass at the rate of 1 metre per second squared. In 1948, the 9th CGPM Resolution 7 adopted the name newton for this force. The MKS system then became the blueprint for today’s SI system of units. The newton thus became the standard unit of force in the International System of Units.

The newton is named after Isaac Newton. As with every SI unit named for a person, its symbol starts with an upper case letter (N), but when written in full it follows the rules for capitalisation of a common noun; i.e., “newton” becomes capitalised at the beginning of a sentence and in titles, but is otherwise in lower case.

In more formal terms, Newton’s second law of motion states that the force exerted on an object is directly proportional to the acceleration hence acquired by that object, namely: F = m a , {displaystyle F=ma,}

where m {\displaystyle m} m represents the mass of the object undergoing an acceleration a {\displaystyle a} a. As a result, the newton may be defined in terms of kilograms ( kg {\displaystyle {\text{kg}}} {\displaystyle {\text{kg}}}), metres ( m {\displaystyle {\text{m}}} {\displaystyle {\text{m}}}), and seconds ( s {\displaystyle {\text{s}}} {\displaystyle {\text{s}}}) as 1   N = 1   kg ⋅ m s 2 . {\displaystyle 1 {\text{N}}=1\ {\frac {{\text{kg}}\cdot {\text{m}}}{{\text{s}}^{2}}}.} {\displaystyle 1\ {\text{N}}=1\ {\frac {{\text{kg}}\cdot {\text{m}}}{{\text{s}}^{2}}}.}

Examples

At average gravity on Earth (conventionally, g = 9.80665 m/s2), a kilogram mass exerts a force of about 9.8 newtons. An average-sized apple exerts about one newton of force, which we measure as the apple’s weight. 1 N = 0.10197 kg × 9.80665 m/s2    (0.10197 kg = 101.97 g).

The weight of an average adult exerts a force of about 608 N. 608 N = 62 kg × 9.80665 m/s2 (where 62 kg is the world average adult mass).

To enquire about Newton Slotted Weights follow the link:

http://www.slotterweight.com/contact/

OIML Systems

Basic and MAA Certificates registered 2015.12–2016.02

Information: www.oiml.org section “OIML Systems”

The OIML Basic Certificate System The OIML Basic Certificate System for Measuring Instruments was introduced in 1991 to facilitate administrative procedures and lower the costs associated with the international trade of measuring instruments subject to legal requirements. The System, which was initially called “OIML Certificate System”, is now called the “OIML Basic Certificate System”. The aim is for “OIML Basic Certificates of Conformity” to be clearly distinguished from “OIML MAA Certificates”. The System provides the possibility for manufacturers to obtain an OIML Basic Certificate and an OIML Basic Evaluation Report (called “Test Report” in the appropriate OIML Recommendations) indicating that a given instrument type complies with the requirements of the relevant OIML International Recommendation. An OIML Recommendation can automatically be included within the System as soon as all the parts – including the Evaluation Report Format – have been published. Consequently, OIML Issuing Authorities may issue OIML Certificates for the relevant category from the date on which the Evaluation Report Format was published; this date is now given in the column entitled “Uploaded” on the Publications Page. Other information on the System, particularly concerning the rules and conditions for the application, issue, and use of OIML Certificates, maybe found in OIML Publication B 3 OIML Basic Certificate System for OIML Type Evaluation of Measuring Instruments (Edition 2011) which may be downloaded from the Publications page of the OIML web site.

  • OIML Systems

Magazine: “Weights & The Society” Volume: 06 & Issue No.: 1

20kg Slotted Weight back side

Logo of SWPIMagazine: Weights & The Society

(Volume: 06  & Issue No.: 1)

Published by Shanker Wire Products Industries

         

GOLDEN JUBILEE CELEBRATIONS OF METRIC SYSTEM IN INDIA

“Legal Metrology – Achievements of India and what it can offer to others.”

Article by:

Sri P.A Krishnamurthy,

Former Director, Legal Metrology, Government of India.      

INTRODUCTION:

The field of ‘Legal Metrology’ or Weights and Measures’ as is known in the common parlance, is the field where measurements are regulated by Government laws for the benefit of all stakeholders. The main object of such regulation is to ensure standardized procedures for calibration acceptable to all stakeholders, transparency in the whole procedure, and accountability of the measurement results.    

THE LAWS OF LEGAL METROLOGY IN INDIA:

Regulation of Weights and Measures were implemented in the early stages of post-independence through the Standards of Weights and Measures Act, 1956, and the standards of Weights and Measures Enforcement Acts of the States and Union Territories. These Acts required the adoption of the metric systems in basic units of mass, length, and volume units in commercial transactions and ensuring verification of certain basic commercial weights and measures weighing and measuring instruments used in mass, length, and volume. The specification of the commercial weights and measures were prepared by the Metric Committee of the then Indian Standards Institution (BIS) and notified in the form of Rules under the Enforcement Act. The metrication and regulation of such rudimentary weights and measures were achieved fairly well by the dedicated enforcement agency throughout the county and in the process, fairly uniform procedures for the regulation of these measuring instruments were achieved with regard to the licensing policy of their manufacture, sale, and repair. Continue reading “Magazine: “Weights & The Society” Volume: 06 & Issue No.: 1″